G20 leaders must not forget promises to the poor


2,000 Christians joined a march through central London on Saturday 28 March to put pressure on G20 leaders “not to forget promises to poor.”n advance of the summit, 32 leaders of Christian, Muslim, Jewish and other faiths called on the political leaders to consider the moral issues at the root of the current financial crisis, and to pay special attention to the needs of poor, marginalized and vulnerable people..

Religious leaders urge G20 not to forget promises to poor London, March 30, IRNA — In a joint communiqué Monday, Britain’s religious leaders urged G20 leaders meeting in London this week not to forget their commitment to the world’s poorest people.
In advance of the summit, 32 leaders of Christian, Muslim, Jewish and other faiths called on the political leaders to consider the moral issues at the root of the current financial crisis, and to pay special attention to the needs of poor, marginalized and vulnerable people.

“To forget their needs would be to compound regrettable past failures with needless future injustices,” warned the signatories, including Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, Muslim Council of Britain Secretary General Abdul Bari and Britain’s Chief Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks.

Other Muslims signing the communiqué included chair of the Christian-Muslim Forum Musharraf Hussain Azhari, Khurshid Drabu from the Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board, Sayyed Nadeem Kazmi of the Britslam Partnership, Ayatollah Sayyid Fazel Milani of Al-Khoei Foundation and chair of Religions for Peace, Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra.

The religious leaders drew attention to promises made by the international community in ‘easier times’ which they said now risk being ‘postponed by the pressing concern to rectify market failures’.

“Even in these difficult times we strongly urge the leaders of the G20 to hold fast to the commitments they have made to the world’s poorest people,” they said.

The communiqué referred to Thursday’s summit, which is facing a series of demonstrations and protest marches, taking place in an atmosphere of high expectation.

“Many people believe that this is a moment for the world’s leaders to reaffirm their moral commitments to the welfare of all, especially the poorest, and to the care of the planet for future generations, as well as responding to the immediate challenges of securing a degree of financial stability,” it said.

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